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May. 26th, 2009

Tall Smart French

Dreaming of East: Western Women and the Exotic Allure of the Orient

Dreaming of East: Western Women and the Exotic Allure of the Orient
by Barbara Hodgson

(Same author as “No Place for a Lady: Tales of Adventurous Women Travellers”, which brought Isabella Bird to my attention. A woman who journeyed to the east with revolver and a tea-making set holsters.)

I grabbed this from the library after I got back from travel. Didn't dampen the wanderlust, but then it wasn't designed to.

Quotes under the cut:Collapse )

Feb. 5th, 2009

Tall Smart French

Lyon, Part Dieu*

*This is a pun. The train station at Lyon is called "Lyon Part Dieu"

I've had a very full day in Lyon. Unlike Paris, where I had a lot of time and really got to drink in lots of museums & galleries in full afternoons, I'm doing Lyon on a city card and cramming in as many sights as possible. So.

Yesterday wandered around some of the different squares and quarteris, and finished the day by going up to Notre Dame de Fourviere. Like Notre Dame de la Gard in Marseille, it's right up the top of a hill/mountain overlooking the city and affords spectacular views at night. (Photos of these things do exist, but the internet connections I'm using are so slow and unreliable that trying to upload photos becomes a source of stress for me. So I'm postponing the activity.)

The YHA Hostel in Lyon is awesome. It's halfway up the same hill as Notre Dame de Fourviere, and to reach it you have to take a funicular! How cool is that!?! There's also a photo in existence of the view out from my dorm room. Direct view down on to Place Bellecour, with its lit up ferris wheel. Fantastic.

Today I started by going to the Musee des Minatures et Decors de Cinema. I had no idea such a place existed in Lyon! Silk textile manufacture, yes. The set decoration from "Perfume: Story of a Murderer", no. It's actually a very well presented museum - full size set dressing from Perfume, about a hundred minature sets as diaramas, and further displays of individual minature objects, at 1/12 or 1/24 scale. Quite fantastic. I always admire such displays of skill and dedication - some of them really are a sight to behold. My favourites would have to be the decoupage pieces. Two different artists, one who does paper cutouts of cursive text laced together with flowers and vines to keep it as a single sheet. The other does the finest tree silhouettes I have ever seen. The thickest parts would be no more than 1mm. Very impressive stuff.

After that I got rained upon. A lot. Accidentally found two textile/knitting shops, but bought nothing. (Don't want to carry the extra weight.) Got rained on some more.

Went to the Musee des Beaux Arts, where I dried off while looking at a pretty impressive gallery. Stuff on display from antiquity all the way through to modern pieces, but I managed to spend most time with the marble sculptures and Italian paintings. This is not terribly surprising.

Then I hit the Musee Lumiere, about the history of cinema. "Lyon, ville d'invention du Cinematographie Lumiere". The museum is set up in the villa of the Lumiere brothers, which is a pretty spectacular villa in and of itself. Three stories, servant's quarters, winter garden-viewing-conservatory room, showpiece staircase, etc. All art deco-ish style. Lots of old movie cameras, the technicalities of which were entirely lost on me. I had a couple of favourite bits - a few years ago they did a tribute film/doco to celebrate 100 years of cinema "Lumiere de (??) compagne". They loaned a bunch of directors one of the old tripod cameras and had them shoot something. And they were big names - Spike Lee, Merchant/Ivory, David Lynch, Peter Greenaway etc. They'd show the footage they shot, which has that same scratchy halting quality as you get from the old silent pics, and also some wider documentary footage as to how each director was approaching it. Spike Lee just set the camera rolling and tried to get a kid to talk. Others went all the way, using cranes and tracks to get the right shot with this very old camera. Quite interesting to watch. They didn't have the film on sale in the shop, so I'll have to see if I can track it down on youtube or something.

The other incredibly cool thing they had on display were the acoutrements for Andre Lumiere's Legion of Honour award. Including the gold embroidered tailcoat and trousers!! And they weren't behind glass! I was able to get some really good closeups. Very impressive work.

I rounded out the day with a trip to the Musee de l'Imprimerie, celebrating all things printing. The displays are rather fun (but I suspect their periodic ateliers are *more* fun), but the temperorary exhibition was extraordinary.

"Un Homme de Lettres: Roger Druet, Calligraphies & Typographies". Large papers and canvases playing with letter forms & art - a series of 25 sheets of paper, each focusing on repititon of a single letter. ("m" was not on display) Incredibly beautiful stuff. Could easilly have some of them hanging on my wall. Really lovely.
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<i>*This is a pun. The train station at Lyon is called "Lyon Part Dieu"</i>

I've had a very full day in Lyon. Unlike Paris, where I had a lot of time and really got to drink in lots of museums & galleries in full afternoons, I'm doing Lyon on a city card and cramming in as many sights as possible. So.

Yesterday wandered around some of the different squares and quarteris, and finished the day by going up to Notre Dame de Fourviere. Like Notre Dame de la Gard in Marseille, it's right up the top of a hill/mountain overlooking the city and affords spectacular views at night. (Photos of these things do exist, but the internet connections I'm using are so slow and unreliable that trying to upload photos becomes a source of stress for me. So I'm postponing the activity.)

The YHA Hostel in Lyon is awesome. It's halfway up the same hill as Notre Dame de Fourviere, and to reach it you have to take a <i>funicular</i>! How cool is that!?! There's also a photo in existence of the view out from my dorm room. Direct view down on to Place Bellecour, with its lit up ferris wheel. Fantastic.

Today I started by going to the Musee des Minatures et Decors de Cinema. I had no idea such a place existed in Lyon! Silk textile manufacture, yes. The set decoration from "Perfume: Story of a Murderer", no. It's actually a very well presented museum - full size set dressing from Perfume, about a hundred minature sets as diaramas, and further displays of individual minature objects, at 1/12 or 1/24 scale. Quite fantastic. I always admire such displays of skill and dedication - some of them really are a sight to behold. My favourites would have to be the decoupage pieces. Two different artists, one who does paper cutouts of cursive text laced together with flowers and vines to keep it as a single sheet. The other does the finest tree silhouettes I have ever seen. The thickest parts would be no more than 1mm. Very impressive stuff.

After that I got rained upon. A lot. Accidentally found two textile/knitting shops, but bought nothing. (Don't want to carry the extra weight.) Got rained on some more.

Went to the Musee des Beaux Arts, where I dried off while looking at a pretty impressive gallery. Stuff on display from antiquity all the way through to modern pieces, but I managed to spend most time with the marble sculptures and Italian paintings. This is not terribly surprising.

Then I hit the Musee Lumiere, about the history of cinema. "Lyon, ville d'invention du Cinematographie Lumiere". The museum is set up in the villa of the Lumiere brothers, which is a pretty spectacular villa in and of itself. Three stories, servant's quarters, winter garden-viewing-conservatory room, showpiece staircase, etc. All art deco-ish style. Lots of old movie cameras, the technicalities of which were entirely lost on me. I had a couple of favourite bits - a few years ago they did a tribute film/doco to celebrate 100 years of cinema "Lumiere de (??) compagne". They loaned a bunch of directors one of the old tripod cameras and had them shoot something. And they were big names - Spike Lee, Merchant/Ivory, David Lynch, Peter Greenaway etc. They'd show the footage they shot, which has that same scratchy halting quality as you get from the old silent pics, and also some wider documentary footage as to how each director was approaching it. Spike Lee just set the camera rolling and tried to get a kid to talk. Others went all the way, using cranes and tracks to get the right shot with this very old camera. Quite interesting to watch. They didn't have the film on sale in the shop, so I'll have to see if I can track it down on youtube or something.

The other incredibly cool thing they had on display were the acoutrements for Andre Lumiere's Legion of Honour award. Including the gold embroidered tailcoat and trousers!! And they weren't behind glass! I was able to get some really good closeups. Very impressive work.

I rounded out the day with a trip to the Musee de l'Imprimerie, celebrating all things printing. The displays are rather fun (but I suspect their periodic ateliers are *more* fun), but the temperorary exhibition was extraordinary.

"Un Homme de Lettres: Roger Druet, Calligraphies & Typographies". Large papers and canvases playing with letter forms & art - a series of 25 sheets of paper, each focusing on repititon of a single letter. ("m" was not on display) Incredibly beautiful stuff. Could easilly have some of them hanging on my wall. Really lovely. <a href="http://images.google.fr/images?hl=fr&amp;q=roger%20druet&amp;um=1&amp;ie=UTF-8&amp;sa=N&amp;tab=wi" google="Google" images="images" brings="brings" some="some" stuff="stuff" up="up" here.</a="here.&lt;/a">

Didn't get to the Roman Theatre/Archeological museum, so maybe tomorrow.
Tags: ,

Feb. 3rd, 2009

Tall Smart French

Orange & Marseille

I really do know the most extraordinary people.

Okay. Picking up last year's theme of "Sunk costs are sunk" and brightcupenny's fantastic Con Amnesty idea, I'm going to delay a full write up of Paris until I have some time to really go back though what I did (and the tickets I have collected). For the moment, suffice to say that Paris was awesome and my affection for the city has done naught but grow in the last month. I was very sorry to be leaving. But bittersweet, as I was to be staying with dear friends in Orange.

Mum & I met A&A when we were in France together through the most tenuous of connections (think six-degrees-of-separation kind of stuff) and they must be among the most hospitable people on the face of the planet. I was very pleased to be seeing them again.

They met me at the station, and first things first: Lunch. I had forgotten how long a family lunch goes for in France. And for how many courses. The first lot of plates being cleared is just the beginning. More food, followed my more food (fruit) and then more food (cheese). It truly is an event. And then I brought out a packet of Tim Tams to have with les cafes. And yes, we did the Tim Tam Slam, the Australian contribution to world cuisine. Something only ever done among friends, it strips the last vestiges of false dignity from any gathering. Went down very well, even if we did have to wipe down the table afterwards. Met with general approval.

Then we went up to see the top of the Roman Theatre in the centre of town. Just take a moment to think about that. We went for a stroll, taking about the same amount of time as it takes me to get to Penrith Plaza at home, and instead of Big W and Supre I was looking at Roman ruins. (One of these things is not like the others...) It's still in use for music festivals and two operas each year, and recently had a new roof fitted. It was necessary for conservation as the rain was becoming destructive to the stone work. The big gates fitted to keep people out seemed to be designed for climbing over and I didn't believe either A or A when they claimed never to have attempted it.

Went for a wander through the town with little market stalls all over the place & picked up some bread for dinner. We stopped at a stall selling metalwork which had the most extraordinary fire screen. I didn't take a photo for two very good reasons. 1) the batteries in my camera had died. 2) The fire screen was so extraordinary that mum would kill me if she saw it and I hadn't bought it. Either one of those reasons would have been enough. For the record, it cost €50 and was a metal fire screen that I really couldn't imagine lugging around for a further two weeks. The written description will have to suffice.

Black iron, square, about 50-60cm, with text punched out all through the sheet. Couldn't make out a lot of it, but most definitely text. Each letter 1-2cm high. Very very cool.

Dinner - more food, more courses, more fruit, more cheese - followed by a bingo ("loto") night at the local school, which was both hilarious and terrifying. Hilarious to see teenage boys win assigned prizes like 5kg of dog food and a barbie doll, and terrifying because I still get French numbers wrong and need to concentrate so as not to confuse 15 with 16, the 20s with 30s and 50s with 60s. All I have to do is repeat the two choices in my head to figure it out, but it's never become automatic and I need to really concentrate. Mercifully the lady reading out the numbers was clear and paused between each one, and I've never been so releaved to NOT win something in my life. (If you claim victory, your numbers are announced for the entire room to hear. It would have been dreadfully embarassing to mistranslate "24" and have the whole hall full of people know about it. Still, it was very effective in sharpenning the mind.)
Back
home for desert (MORE food) - the Gallete des Rois of which we consumed half. No fevre/santon was found so the household remined a republic for another day. (Mother, I have more crowns and three more santons to bring home, one in my pocket as I type this.)

Turned in for a very comfortable night's rest with a room overlooking the countryside. ::sigh::

Sunday morning breakfast, followed by a trip to the market. The one we went to was both a flea market and a food market - many people out and about, but I am told there are many many more in summer. I rather liked some of the collections of Moroccan Tea glasses, but managed to resist the lure of teapots and tea trays from the "tarnish resistant" collection ;-) On the way back (or there?? I don't remember) we took the scenic route which unexpectedly turns into the Roman Arch in the centre of town. I remember seeing it last time, but this time it was covered in scaffolding! They tried to surprise me with their back roads but were equally surprised themselves ;-)

Lunch (more food).

In the afternoon we went out to see the Pont du Gard, the Roman aquaduc(t). SO COOL. It was raining a little bit so there weren't many people there, but you get to walk on the new bridge which is built directly beside the original aquaduct - all rather fantastic. Roman engineering had a lot going for it & it's a very impressive sight. From the right angle you can see the slight curve built into the structure to protect against strong currents from the heavy rainfall in the area. Smart cookies.

I was very sad to be leaving Orange after such a short time, but such time with good friends is always too short. I hope to see them again soon.

Arrived safely in Marseille and am staying with P&M. More fantastic people! More food! Having a very quiet day today as the weather in Marseille is not condusive to being anywhere other than indoors and all the museums are closed on Mondays. So I had a lazy sleep in, a lazy breakfast, a lazy lunch, and now I'm catching up on some blogging in the lounge room. The wind is blowing very strongly. You can hear it howling around the building. There are strong shutters on all the windows. It's strange, being so high up, you can hear the wind but not see any of the affects. No trees being blown about or umbrellas turning inside out - just the sound of air moving very fast. Again, I'm glad to be inside.

They have a fantastic apartment, filled with shelves and shelves of books and a view out to the Vieux Port and the Mediteranean. Incredible! And there were many dictionaries brought out at breakfast this morning, making me feel very much at home.

Now I am contemplating the virtues of an afternoon nap. I haven't had a proper rest day probably since London, and a bit of downtime will do me good I'm sure.

Jan. 14th, 2009

Poised

(no subject)

BEST. BIRTHDAY. EVER.

I have Versailles & the Louvre to update from the weekend, but this will do for this evening:

1) Found out this morning that I got full marks in last week's French quiz. YAY.

2) Had my French class sing happy birthday to me - in French.

3) Picked up my Birthday Cake Substitute. (See #10)

4) Ascended the Eiffel Tower. (Third floor closed, so only to the 2nd). Still, magnificent. I keep thinking I've reached the stage where I'm used to the new & brilliant & amazing - and then I see the view out over Paris and that ear to ear grin returns. Yeah, it was raining a bit, but who cares?

5) Dropped into La Droguerie. Didn't buy anything, but nice to browse.

6) Walked down the Seine. It looked like this.
Birthday: Walk down the Seine

7) Had dinner at a quiet vegetarian restaurant in Ile St Louis and the most amazing sorbet afterwards. Berthillon Framboise avec Petailes de Rose is DIVINE.

8) On the way back, there was a guy at the metro station playing the waltz from Amelie. On the piano accordion.

9) Picked up a baguette on my way back for lunch tomorrow. Because that's the sort of thing I do now.

10) Returned to my room. Turned on BBC World News to see a clip of Ben Bernanke speaking at the LSE. Only a clip, mind you. Not the whole thing. (How dare they ruin my birthday by cutting it short?!) Will have to download later.

11) Opened & partially consumed my Birthday Cake Substitute. Because, truly, how many times does one turn 30 in one's life?

12) Alors, j'ai besoin de faire mes devoirs.

13) Because I was uncontactable by phone today, it made for a very quiet, peaceful, calm, tranquil day. See subject line. Brilliant start to my 30s. I wasn't being interrupted every 5 minutes but what I did get were many emails, LJ comments & facebook notes from people with much the same sentiment, but without demanding my attention at a time of their convenience. YAY. Love you all.

Jan. 12th, 2009

Poised

30: I'm not the only one.

Early in 1785, [Marie Antoinette] had announced to Rose Bertin that, as she would be turning thirty that November, she intended to “reform her accessories and adornments, which were better suited to a younger woman, and to stop wearing both feathers and flowers.” Duly Marie Antoinette renounced her whimsical coiffures in favour of what Antonia Fraser has described as “more matronly” headdresses made from gauze, satin, and velvet, and trimmed with fur or regal jewelled aigrettes. The Queen modified the rest of her wardrobe as well, leading the contemporary chronicler François Métra to observe at the end of February “that Her Majesty’s approach to dress has altered, that she no longer wants chemises, or redingotes, or polonaises, or lévites” (all of which had once predominated at Trianon) and that she “has taken up again the more serious” robes à la française. According to the Baronne d’Oberkirch, Marie Antoinette required the ladies of Versailles to do the same and “to abdicate, like herself, plumes, flowers, and even the color pink” if they were thirty or older.

Queen of Fashion: What Marie Antoinette Wore to the Revolution
Caroline Weber

Jan. 11th, 2009

Poised

I love Paris in the spr....why the hell do I keep going on holidays in the middle of bloody winter?

My last entry finished with "Arrived safely in Paris", which is true. I did indeed arrive safely in Paris...to experience the kind of cold snap that stops flights from taking off in major airports. Yeah, we got snow, which I am singularly ill-equipped for. Direct quote from yesterday: "It's only minus one this afternoon. I might go for a walk outside before it gets cold again." This from an Australian who usually thinks sixteen is unbearably cold and worth moaning about all day! I am much grateful for my thermal leggings and Kathmandu jackets. That's right, jackets: plural. My day to day outfit is: underwear, singlet, thermal underwear (long sleeve t-shirt and leggings), jeans, turtleneck, Kathmandu wind-proof polar fleece jacket, Kathmandu wind-and-rain-proof hooded outer jacket, thick socks, walking shoes, scarf, flippy mittens, hat. When I'm inside I remove the mittens and unzip the outer jacket.

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Jan. 3rd, 2009

Poised

Oxford, martyrdom & train dramas

Pics up on flickr.

Decided on a whim to go to Oxford, the idea being that if I was this close and didn't go, I'd regret it terribly. Booked tickets & accommodation online (yay laptop & wifi!) and arrived with a day and a half in the city.

Not much was open on New Year's Day (don't people know there are tourists out there, demanding to be entertained & cultured at every available moment?!), so I went on a guided walking tour from the tourist office. It was nowhere near as good as the one at Bath - also not free, unlike Bath, but I suppose it will always come down to the quality of the individual guides and the dynamic of the group. (Mini lecture on the Israeli/Palestinian conflict? With no reference to Oxford? For real?!?) It was nice to go past some of the major landmarks, though, so I ignored the commentary and took photos.

The best part, and also the part where I left the group, was Magdalen College. Took some photos of amazing looking buildings & scenery. Pixels on flickr don't do it justice at all. Took a long walk around the gardens by the river where my feet nearly dropped off from being frozen. I'd turn a corner and see some remarkable view of a well trodden path lined with ancient trees along a stream. With ducks. You don't think scenes like that exist in real life. They're all stage managed by a set designer for a film or something. But there it was, in the freezing cold winter, these picture perfect paths.

The two pieces of information I did value from the guide were the locations of both Oscar Wilde's and C S Lewis's rooms while they were at the college. There are photos of both up on flickr.

And yet again, everything is so green! They have lawns! With grass! No level 3 water restrictions in Oxford, obviously.

This morning I went to Christ Church College & cathedral - equally picturesque. I started by taking a stroll down by the river, by the boat sheds, where two complete idiots were on the river doing rowing training. Honestly. I thought Oxford was for smart people!

Then I walked around the college. Highlights were: The Dining Hall with the unbelievable fluted ceiling, used for filming HP:PS and HP:CoS. I was going to stand outside the doors and pretend to be McGonnagal, but I could never convincingly pull off Gryffindor. (Ravenclaw. It's all about Ravenclaw. These are my people.) This is also the Lewis Carol college, so there are lots of little Alice in Wonderland bits. One of the stained glass windows has little pictures of the Alice characters in the corners! So cute!

Through to the cathedral, where there was the usual cathedral-y sort of stuff (how quickly one becomes jaded about such things), but I was very interested to note that it was the place where John and Charles Wesley were ordained! Very cool. I hummed a bit. Also interesting that they get a stone in the floor (getting one of those in a cathedral is rather like getting a star on the Hollywood walk of fame thingy) considering the C of E wasn't too happy with them at the time.

Massive courtyard/quadrangle which was apparently originally going to be covered as a cloister but never got finished. At this point the sun came out and I got some photos that didn't need the flash! Yay!

Moving through to the end of the visitor's walk, there was some looked-like-it-was-semi-officially-sanctioned chalk graffiti on the walls of one of the residence buildings. It was the only graffiti I've ever seen that involved detailed heraldic arms and Gothic fonts. It seems that whenever a college sporting team wins something major, the results and the crest go up on one of the panels for all to see. The most faded ones I could make out were from 1999.

Turning around from there you can see the college library. Well, I say you can see it (which is true if you're there), but even if you stand back to the wall there is no way it can be entirely captured in a camera viewfinder. I have a photo of a section of a college library. Would that all libraries were such palaces! But I could do without the "no visitors" sign at the front.

Took afternoon tea at one of the tea shops outside the college, next to "The Alice Shop" which stocks all manner of Alice in Wonderland merchandise. It's always so nice to use a teapot!

The afternoon was spent up two towers. Firstly Carfax tower, which has great views of the very many other towers and steeples in the skyline. There is no towering centrepiece to the Oxford skyline, just lots of similarly scaled magnificent points of interest.

Then I wandered around for a bit more & saw a sign on St Michael's church & tower saying that they had the door behind which Cranmer, Latimer & Ridley were imprisoned before their martyrdom. I had no idea such a thing still existed! (And I confess I had completely forgotten it had happened in Oxford). So up the tower I duly went, but spent most time on the platform now housing the door. I considered taking a self portrait to prove that I had indeed touched the door that held them, but decided that treating it as essentially a relic would be too ironic for words. It was a powerful reminder that these things I've learned in history - general history and church history - aren't just stories in books but actually happened to real people. And while they're not William Tyndale, these are my guys. Reformers who died rather than recant the protestant faith, the five solas. I can only hope and pray that I will stand as firm for that same gospel they died for.

It also reminded me that two days into the new year and I still hadn't read my Bible. So, St Michael's being a Church of England building, I took advantage of the regulation that states that all Anglican churches have to have a readily accessible Bible on display at all times. I read Galatians, keeping in mind the scandal of grace and the freedom I have in Christ.

It is for freedom that Christ has set us free. Stand firm, then, and do not let yourselves be burdened again by a yoke of slavery.
Galatians 5:1

Then I went to Broad Street where the place where they were all burned is marked on the street. There's no plaque or anything, just a cobblestone cross in the centre of the road. People walk & cycle over it every day. I suppose it's a good reminder to be had at Oxford, for those who care to remember it, of the radical and dangerous nature of what Jesus came for and the apostles preached. Come, Lord Jesus!

Then I went to pick up my pack from the hostel for my train back to London. Went to the station, got my ticket - dramas aplenty! There was a signal failure AND a plane crash on the train line. No trains were going through Oxford. After an hour's wait and nearly heading for the bus station, they started diverting London passengers on trains going to Birmingham! So now instead of getting to the hostel at 8pm I'll probably make it at 11.30. But at least I'll make it, and at least I'm not going to miss the connection tomorrow. I'm being thankful for such mercies.

ETA: Arrived safely in Paris. YAY!
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Jan. 1st, 2009

Poised

Photos uploaded

Got a big batch of photos uploaded. Salisbury, Winchester, Stonehenge, Bath & Oxford.
Tall Smart French

Roman Baths, Fashion Museum & adventures in the Bath YMCA

Public holidays are such an inconvenience when one is travelling. They disrupt one's schedule and nothing is open! What I had thought to take two days has now happened in one.

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Dec. 31st, 2008

Poised

2008 year in review

This year, I have (highlights):


  • Graduated from the Diploma of Biblical Studies with first class honours

  • Done a corset making class at NIDA

  • Attended a lecture about Hand & Lock embroidery at the Powerhouse

  • Joined a new church where I knew no one

  • Won the Freakonomics haiku competition

  • Made listener feedback on Filmspotting - twice (Best Dressed and Girlcrushes Top 5s)

  • Joined a gym, attended regularly, and ended up being able to run for 2 consecutive 8 minute stretches

  • Touched my toes (without bending my legs) for the first time in my life. Also broke my toe for the first time in my life. Both attributable to the gym.

  • Didn't get flu this winter. I also attribute this to the gym.

  • Travelled. Which is a whole list unto itself, but you've all been hearing me blather on about it so I won't give a recap.

  • Knitted an entire entrelac stole in the 17 days of the summer olympics

  • Heard Don Carson and Mark Driscoll preach in person at Engage08 up at KCC.

  • Decluttered, like woah.



TV Shows new this year:

  • The Hollowmen

  • 30 Rock

  • The Gruen Transfer

  • Top Gear Australia (which didn't end up being as awful as it could have been)

  • Docos on Savile Row and British Style Genius

  • Dr Horrible's Sing Along Blog (which isn't strictly TV, but I've nowhere else to put it)


ETA: Underbelly. How could I forget?

TV Shows continuing:

  • Top Gear

  • Ugly Betty

  • Boston Legal

  • Spooks

  • Doctor Who



Books:

  • Freakonomics

  • Gang Leader for a Day

  • Down and Out in Paris and London (would be a good double feature with the above)

  • Queen of Fashion: What Marie Antoinette Wore to the Revolution

  • Various Lonely Planet guides


Plus many more that I can't quite recall at 8.30 pm on NYE.


2008 Motto:
Sunk Costs Are Sunk.

2009 Motto:
Do Hard Things.

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